Chinese Restaurant in Pittsburgh Ordered to Close Due to Severe Health Code Violations

A popular Chinese restaurant in Pittsburgh’s Greenfield neighborhood has been forced to shut down its doors indefinitely after a recent inspection revealed a staggering number of health code violations. China Star, which has been a local staple for years, was found to have a total of 20 violations during the inspection, six of which were classified as high risk.

Inspectors discovered several alarming practices that posed serious threats to public health. Among the high-risk violations were the presence of rodent droppings and dead bugs in the food, unsanitary storage of old cooked food at room temperature, improper handling of uncovered food, a lack of handwashing during food preparation, and food contact surfaces covered in grease, old food residue, and rodent droppings. These findings are not only unsanitary but also potentially hazardous to consumers.

In addition to the high-risk violations, inspectors also observed several lower-level violations, including inadequate lighting in cooking areas, floors and equipment covered in grease, uncovered buckets of food, and poor date marking. Although these violations may not pose an immediate health risk, they are clear indications of poor hygiene practices within the establishment.

The Allegheny County Health Department wasted no time in ordering the immediate closure of China Star to protect the well-being of customers. Correctional action plans were issued for each violation, outlining the necessary steps that the restaurant must take to address and rectify the issues before it can be allowed to reopen.

While it remains uncertain when or if China Star will be able to resume its operations, one thing is painfully clear: the health and safety of customers must always be a priority. This incident serves as a stark reminder of the importance of rigorous health code enforcement to ensure that restaurants are held accountable for maintaining stringent hygiene standards.

FAQ Section:

1. Why was China Star forced to shut down?
China Star was forced to shut down due to a recent inspection that revealed a total of 20 health code violations, six of which were classified as high risk.

2. What were some of the high-risk violations found?
Some of the high-risk violations found at China Star included the presence of rodent droppings and dead bugs in the food, unsanitary storage of old cooked food at room temperature, improper handling of uncovered food, a lack of handwashing during food preparation, and food contact surfaces covered in grease, old food residue, and rodent droppings.

3. What were some of the lower-level violations found?
Some of the lower-level violations found at China Star included inadequate lighting in cooking areas, floors and equipment covered in grease, uncovered buckets of food, and poor date marking.

4. Why did the health department order the immediate closure of China Star?
The health department ordered the immediate closure of China Star to protect the well-being of customers due to the numerous health code violations found during the inspection.

5. What happens next for China Star?
Correctional action plans were issued for each violation, outlining the necessary steps that the restaurant must take to address and rectify the issues before it can be allowed to reopen. It remains uncertain when or if China Star will be able to resume its operations.

Definitions:

Health code violations: Violations of the regulations and guidelines set by health departments to ensure food safety and public health in restaurants and other food establishments.

Rodent droppings: Excrement left by rodents such as rats or mice.

Unsanitary: Not clean or hygienic, posing a risk to health and well-being.

Handwashing: The act of cleaning one’s hands to remove dirt, bacteria, and other potentially harmful substances.

Hygiene standards: Guidelines and practices aimed at maintaining cleanliness, sanitation, and health in various settings, including restaurants.

Suggested related links:
Alberta Health Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Food Standards Australia New Zealand
American Cancer Society
The Wall Street Journal